Angel Colberg

Multidisciplinary Designer and Developer

  1. NASA CHIEF - LONG TERM, EARTH IS NOT SUSTAINABLE

    rodmoose:

    WE HAVE TO PRESERVE AND PROTECT IT, AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE OF OUR SPECIES

    A group of guests with extended social media reach, myself included, where invited by NASA, to attend the OCO2 carbon measuring satellite launch at Vandenberg AFB on the Central Coast of California June 30-July 1, 2014.

  2. Facebook's Slingshot is basically broken.

    uarrrorg:

    Say what you want, tell me that Slingshot is a new way of thinking and interacting with each other, that doesn’t change the one big problem:

    When a friend took a bit of her time to update me about her life and what’s happening in it, I want to see it as soon as possible.

    When a friend sends…

    • Seis

  3. wearephoenix:

    We support Fair Use of our music!

    We were upset to find out that a lecture by Professor Lawrence Lessig titled ‘Open’ was removed from YouTube without review, under the mistaken belief that it infringed our copyright interests.

    This lecture about Fair-Use included -as examples- bits of spontaneous fan videos using our song Lisztomania.

    Not only do we welcome the illustrative use of our music for educational purposes, but, more broadly, we encourage people getting inspired and making their own versions of our songs and videos and posting the result online.

    One of the great beauties of the digital era is to liberate spontaneous creativity - it might be a chaotic space of free association sometimes but the contemporary experience of digital re-mediation is enormously liberating.

    We don’t feel the least alienated by this; appropriation and recontextualization is a long-standing behavior that has just been made easier and more visible by the ubiquity of internet.

    In a few words:
    We absolutely support Fair Use of our music,

    and we can only encourage a new copyright policy that protects Fair Use as much as every creators’ legitimate interests.

    PHOENIX

  4. UX Crash Course: 31 Fundamentals

    thehipperelement:

    My New Year’s Resolution for 2014 was to get more people started in User Experience (UX) Design. I posted one lesson every day in January, and thousands of people came to learn!

    Below you will find links to all 31 daily lessons.


    Basic UX Principles: How to get started

    The following list…

  5. Recruiting: There is no such thing as a developer shortage

    sarajchipps:

    I talk to founders, CTOs, CEOs and hiring managers of startups often. I host and go to quite a few social events monthly that they gather at, besides them being a large part of my friend group. While they are all amazingly brilliant and I gather much wisdom by osmosis; one thing I hear quite often…

    (Source: sarajchipps)

  6. fiftythreenyc:

EVERY STORY HAS A NAME
FiftyThree’s story began with Paper. What began with three guys building an app out of a New York City apartment has gone on to become one of the most celebrated applications on iOS, defining mobile creativity and winning Apple’s 2012 iPad App of the Year. Paper embodied our belief that technology should support the human need to create. It’s a beautifully simple app that lets anyone capture their ideas and share them over the web. For millions of creators around the world, Paper is where they call home for their ideas—100 million, in fact, over the last two years. Paper has come to represent endless creative potential, and we couldn’t have asked for a better beginning to our story.
Stories have twists.
So it came as a surprise when we learned on January 30th with everyone else that Facebook was announcing an app with the same name—Paper. Not only were we confused but so were our customers (twitter) and press (1,2,3,4). Was this the same Paper? Nope. Had FiftyThree been acquired? Definitely not. Then, what’s going on?
We reached out to Facebook about the confusion their app was creating, and they apologized for not contacting us sooner. But an earnest apology should come with a remedy.
 Stories reveal character. 
There’s a simple fix here. We think Facebook can apply the same degree of thought they put into the app into building a brand name of their own. An app about stories shouldn’t start with someone else’s story. Facebook should stop using our brand name.
On a personal level we have many ties to Facebook. Many friends, former students and colleagues are doing good work at Facebook. One of Facebook’s board members is an investor in FiftyThree. We’re a Facebook developer, and Paper supports sharing to Facebook where close to 500,000 original pages have been shared. Connections run deep.
What will Facebook’s story be? Will they be the corporate giant who bullies their developers? Or be agile, recognize a mistake, and fix it? Is it “Move fast and break things” or “Move fast and make things”?
We’re all storytellers. And we show care for each other by caring for our stories. Thanks for supporting us.
Georg PetschniggCo-Founder and CEOFiftyThree

    fiftythreenyc:

    EVERY STORY HAS A NAME

    FiftyThree’s story began with Paper. What began with three guys building an app out of a New York City apartment has gone on to become one of the most celebrated applications on iOS, defining mobile creativity and winning Apple’s 2012 iPad App of the Year. Paper embodied our belief that technology should support the human need to create. It’s a beautifully simple app that lets anyone capture their ideas and share them over the web. For millions of creators around the world, Paper is where they call home for their ideas—100 million, in fact, over the last two years. Paper has come to represent endless creative potential, and we couldn’t have asked for a better beginning to our story.

    Stories have twists.

    So it came as a surprise when we learned on January 30th with everyone else that Facebook was announcing an app with the same name—Paper. Not only were we confused but so were our customers (twitter) and press (1,2,3,4). Was this the same Paper? Nope. Had FiftyThree been acquired? Definitely not. Then, what’s going on?

    We reached out to Facebook about the confusion their app was creating, and they apologized for not contacting us sooner. But an earnest apology should come with a remedy.

    Stories reveal character.

    There’s a simple fix here. We think Facebook can apply the same degree of thought they put into the app into building a brand name of their own. An app about stories shouldn’t start with someone else’s story. Facebook should stop using our brand name.

    On a personal level we have many ties to Facebook. Many friends, former students and colleagues are doing good work at Facebook. One of Facebook’s board members is an investor in FiftyThree. We’re a Facebook developer, and Paper supports sharing to Facebook where close to 500,000 original pages have been shared. Connections run deep.

    What will Facebook’s story be? Will they be the corporate giant who bullies their developers? Or be agile, recognize a mistake, and fix it? Is it “Move fast and break things” or “Move fast and make things”?

    We’re all storytellers. And we show care for each other by caring for our stories. Thanks for supporting us.

    Georg Petschnigg
    Co-Founder and CEO
    FiftyThree

  7. starwars:


The shadow of the Empire is cast on a major city on Lothal in this previously unseen concept art by Andre Kirk from the upcoming animated series Star Wars Rebels.

    starwars:

    The shadow of the Empire is cast on a major city on Lothal in this previously unseen concept art by Andre Kirk from the upcoming animated series Star Wars Rebels.

    • nye13

    • xmas-2013

  8. The Founder's Lie About Comfort Zones

    klinger-io:

    There is a lot of talk going on about the endurance and struggle that startup founders go through. How long the hours are, we all pull through and how we are constantly out of our comfort zone.

    We run startups – we are constantly at the border of our comfort zone. Aren’t we?

    No we…

    • Nostalgia

    • December 2013

  9. This way of thinking about the computer as an evocative object puts us on the inside of a new inside joke. For when psychoanalysts talked about object relations, they had always been talking about people. From the beginning, people saw computers as “almost-alive” or “sort of alive.” With the computer, object relations psychoanalysis can be applied to, well, objects. People feel at one with video games, with lines of computer code, with the avatars they play in virtual worlds, with their smartphones. Classical transitional objects are meant to be abandoned, their power recovered in moments of heightened experience. When our current digital devices—our smartphones and cellphones—take on the power of transitional objects, a new psychology comes into play. These digital objects are never meant to be abandoned. We are meant to become cyborg.